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    Archive for June 30th, 2014




    When people discuss the Internet of Everything (IoE), it refers to the introduction of computing power and networking capabilities to previously “dumb” devices like television sets, cars, pedometers, and appliances. Many believe that it is the next big thing in tech, and it offers users a wide array of benefits, allowing them to save time, money, or even improve their lives.  These gadgets range from the merely nice to have, all the way to mission critical tools.

    However, the Internet connectivity and computing power of these devices – the very things that makes them “smart” – introduces security risks as well. For instance, in smart TVs facial and speech recognition features are problematic in terms of privacy. Self-driving cars may be hacked and cause injure to their occupants or passers-by. Pervasive wearable tech, while useful to their owners, may be considered a privacy threat by bystanders.

    We’ve earlier talked about the factors that will influence the proliferation of smart devices in homes. These factors include market pressures, regional availability and cultural acceptance. Smart home devices are being marketed and are readily available, whether in stores or online. In addition, in some markets broadband providers are also selling these devices to their existing customers, adding home automation to existing Internet and cable TV plans.

    Cybercriminals go after the platforms and devices that are popular with users. However, while smart devices may be the “next big thing”, they have not yet been broadly adopted. In our 2014 predictions, we noted that there is no “killer app” that many users will consider a must-have; such an “killer app” would lead to a wide-scale adoption of smart devices.

    However, the numbers of people adopting smart devices will only grow. These early adopters need to be aware of the various security risks of these devices – not only to their personal information and privacy, but also to their safety and well-being.

    For more information on the security risks and how to secure smart devices, visit our Internet of Everything hub which contains our materials that discuss this emerging field.

     



    Evolution is a continuous process, and nothing can exemplify the process better in our industry than the threats we defend against. From simple pranks and nuisances, they’ve become thieves of information, violators of privacy, destroyers of reputations and even saboteurs of businesses, all for the sake of money. They’ve also become tools for activists and terrorists of the cyber variety, used to make strong statements against governments or organizations.

    But as such threats evolve, so must the security solutions that defend against them, or be left in the dust. This is our ethos in Trend Micro – that the protection we provide for our customers not only improve with every version we come out with, but continuously evolve into more powerful, more efficient and more impenetrable to cybercriminal attacks.

    Our latest infographic, Trend Micro Endpoint Security Technology Evolution: A Complete Approach to Security, illustrates this. Using the visualization of a tree taking root and sprouting branches from its tree trunk, we catalog the evolution of cybercrime as well as the technologies we developed to address those malicious evolutions.

    Take malware, for example, one of the main tools of cybercrime.From its primal state as a prank program to how it’s become a money-making machine, we’ve not only developed one but three technologies to address it:

    • Signature-based Scanning, which identifies, isolates and deletes malware by matching it to a specific malware signature/pattern;
    • Heuristic Behavior Scanning, which detects polymorphic malware  through its malicious behavior, and;
    • File Reputation Services, which identifies and blocks malware through their history, sources, behavior and reputation.

    Each of these technologies work in conjunction with each other, as well as those that address the other tools of cybercrime – to provide a well-rounded and balanced approach to security that families and businesses deserve.

     

     
    Posted in Exploits, Malware, Mobile |


     

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